Christian faith


This is the basic text of a lecture at Bradford Cathedral today at the launch of the centenary year. It is quite long.

Bradford Cathedral is 100 years old in 2019. That is, this building has been a cathedral since 1919, but the building has been here for many centuries before that. It is living evidence of Christian worship, service and faithfulness through times of peace and conflict, change and challenge, struggle and joy. It was designated a cathedral within just one year of the end of the so-called “War to end all wars”. European and wider global manhood had been cut to shreds by the developing technological weaponry disposed at the hands of people the Enlightenment had told us were progressing. So, this cathedral witnessed the loss of Bradford’s youth and innocence and tried to shape a lens of experience and perception through which a bruised generation might look at its torn world and find ways of making it better.

Fifteen years later Adolf Hitler took power in a democratic election in Germany and twenty one years later Bradford was back at war. Do we ever really learn from history?

Well, here we are today celebrating the centenary of this cathedral as a cathedral, now one of three in a single diocese (a first in the Church of England), at a time of considerable political uncertainty at home and abroad. Have we learned from past experience how to live faithfully in the twenty first century with its challenges and opportunities, with its particular manifestations of age-old and oft-repeated political and social phenomena?

One such phenomenon is that of populism, a word that makes many people worry and yet one that ignites fire in the belly of some who are fed up with the status quo and who welcome any disruption of the old order. And this is the theme of this lecture – one that will only touch the surface of the current phenomenon, but will try to raise questions for fruitful consideration and debate.

It is hard to open a journal or newspaper these days without coming across the word ‘populism’ somewhere. But, although frequently cited, it is rarely defined. The lack of definition means that it is a weapon that can be wielded by anyone on any side of any political debate to describe pejoratively those with whom one disagrees.

But, why the revival of ‘populism’ now – as a term or a concept or a phenomenon?

In brief, the current world order is perceived to be changing – changing with a rapidity that leaves people feeling out of control. Like ‘post-modernism’, we know what we are ‘post’ – leaving behind; but, we don’t know what we are ‘pre’ – what sort of an order (or dis-order) we are creating. This uncertainty creates fear, and fear is not the best motivator for individual or collective behaviour. What is being fundamentally challenged in the West is the root assumption that (a) post-war liberalism is self-evidently right and obvious, (b) that the rules-based international order that grew out of half a century of global conflict (played out on the same soil that gave birth to the Enlightenment) is worth preserving, and (c) that globalisation and the pulling down of national borders benefits everyone.

Some commentators describe this challenge as a decade-delayed consequence of elite groups – international bankers and financiers, for example – who caused a global financial and economic crash and got away with it scot-free. (No one went to jail…) Poor people have to pay for the failures and crimes of the rich – which reinforces the suspicion that the dice are loaded in favour of the rich and powerful. The first casualty of this injustice is the destruction of trust in authority and institutions, accompanied by a carelessness about consequences of resistance. It is from this stable that the “we have had enough of experts” horse has bolted (even if the jockey is a privileged and Oxbridge educated journalist and government minister who has the nerve to refer to others as “the establishment elite”).

The important bit to note is the sense of impotence that all this evoked in entire communities. We can’t even control our own lives; our society is being overrun by foreigners; we are victims of decisions and priorities set by people who are unaccountable and act with impunity; we have been left behind.

Enter Donald Trump, Nigel Farage, Jair Bolsonaro, Matteo Salvini, Viktor Orban and the AfD. What they (and others) have in common is an ability to reduce complexity to simple slogans and to answer complex questions with simplistic solutions: “Take back control”; “Drain the swamp”; Islam or freedom?”; “Make America great again”. Language is key, fear is fundamental, and hope is reduced to instant gratification of visceral demand.

So, populism feeds off fear and insecurity, building a narrative of victimhood at the hands of ‘others’ who are trying to do me/us down. Well, we will come back to this later. First, let’s just note a bit of context. Nick Spencer of Theos points out:

  • In 1900 there were no fully-fledged democracies
  • In 1950 28% of regimes were fully democratic
  • By 2000 65% of regimes were fully democratic
  • From 2010 “fewer countries were making the transition to stable political accountability” and democracy began to retreat – ‘democratic recession’.

Old world assumptions were being challenged and fundamental assumptions about the inevitability of progress – technological and educational leading to moral – were being questioned. Three years ago it was unthinkable that a divorced atheist could be elected as President of the United States or an amoral liar could be appointed as the UK’s Foreign Secretary.

Of course, one of the learnings from that half-century of global violence was that populism can be manipulated by clever, charismatic and powerful people who offer simplistic solutions to complex questions. We learn from history, don’t we?

So, populism isn’t new; nor are those features of it with which we are becoming more familiar in Europe and beyond today. Human beings don’t really change. Technological sophistication and great learning do not necessarily make us morally stronger or more virtuous. As the Bishop of Hannover made clear in Ripon Cathedral on Remembrance Day, civilisation is thin, order is fragile, and chaos waits for a crack to appear. And when it does, emotional appeal trumps rational argument.

One of the books that made a deep impression on me when I was a student of German politics was called Open Thy Mouth for the Dumb (citing the book of Proverbs). It was written by Richard Gutteridge and detailed the failure of the German churches to offer opposition to the rise of Hitler in Weimar Germany. It is a painful read … and, like Christopher Clark’s great book on the origins of the First World War, Sleepwalkers, demonstrates how easily people are moved to do and defend terrible things, and how intimidating it is to oppose the powerful mass. But, it also cries out with the Christian need for courage in giving a voice to the voiceless and defying the agencies of violence, destruction and death.

If you find yourself in Berlin, visit the relatively new Topography of Terror museum (built on the site of the Nazi’s Gestapo HQ) and see how it depicts the slow disintegration of civil society as virtues are compromised bit by bit under the chipping away by the populist language and action of people who were good with words and symbols.

And remember how Ernst Thälmann rejected teaming up with other socialists in Weimar Germany because he thought that allying with Hitler and the Nazis would then allow the people – das Volk – to drop the obviously mad and bad Nazis and leave the self-evidently right Communists to rule. That miscalculation died with Thälmann in a concentration camp and the other 50 million expendables in other people’s political games.

Is popular affection always a bad thing? No, of course not. (On another occasion this year we will look at the popular resistance that led to the demise of communism – in the German Democratic Republic a resistance that was given space by churches  in places like Leipzig. We also need to recognise that this also gave rise eventually to a renewed rise of the Far Right in Germany.) But the word ‘populism’ is normally associated with a negative expression of popular will and the forces that generate division and fear. Yet, as I read somewhere recently: “Populism can sometimes sound like the name that disconcerted liberals give to the kind of politics in which ordinary people don’t do what liberals tell them.”

Much has been – and continues to be – written about populism, and there are some very good resources to help us understand what is happening in the world today. Of course, populism is, by definition, about the populace – the people. But, who are ‘the people’? If we look at Brexit and the 2016 referendum on UK membership of the European Union, for example, ‘the people’ appeared to be split down the middle: 52% to 48%. In the early hours of 24 June, as the result became clear, I tweeted: “The people have spoken, but we don’t know what they have said.” What I missed here was that ‘the people’ included both the 52% who voted to leave the EU and the 48% who voted to remain. However, it was not long before the Brexiteers began brandishing the sword of linguistic appropriation by identifying only Leavers as ‘the people’. This is what led in time to the Daily Mail loading a front page with photographs of Supreme Court judges under the heading ‘ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE’. Not even a question mark.

At a meeting in the Cabinet Office about Brexit I asked the minister how we are to handle common slogans that are never defined, but used against opponents. I asked what we do if a slogan such as “the will of the people” turns out not to be “in the national interest”. This went down really well … and I still have received no answer to what I think is a very important question.

We shall return to the specific matter of language later, but it might be useful to summarise a few statements that might help us clarify what we mean when we speak of populism. I offer the following (somewhat selective) characteristics:

  • The language of populism assumes that society is divided between, on the one hand, ‘the people’ (noble, innocent, hard done to and pure) and, on the other hand, ‘the elite’ (corrupt, greedy, unaccountable, ignorant of life on the ground, detached from most people’s reality) – and the elite are always ‘the others’.
  • Populism feeds, and feeds off, emotion, not rational analysis.
  • Populism is more about style than substance – feeling rather than policies.
  • Populist leaders claim the ‘will of the people’ and quickly disregard democratic norms on the grounds that we are in crisis. Disruption is the name of the game: fearmongering, the promotion of conspiracy theories, the undermining of trust (in, for example, media and institutions).
  • Populism generates a culture of victimhood and diminishes resilience.

In a new book (Confronting Religious Violence) Rabbi Jonathan Sacks writes: to gain traction “populism has to identify an enemy”. It then amplifies its claims of victimhood at the hands of the enemy, using language to dehumanise or disrupt. Years before the onset of the French Revolution, Edmund Burke recognised that abstract terms such as ‘liberty’ or ‘equality’ had the power to move people without enlightening them. Words shape actions – and populists assert by slogan, use street language instead of careful and polite analysis, and corrupt the public discourse with language that defies definition, but hits at the heart of popular emotion. Just think about what is meant by the slogans I cited at the beginning of this lecture.

The disruptive language of the populists deliberately generates distrust of authorities – especially politicians, the media and experts – but feels no need to justify its own assumptions. Reality or rationality are dispensed with on the altar of visceral emotion as the populists set themselves up over against those they decry. They are ‘the people’ – their opponents are what? Identity politics are not neutral here.

Let’s return for a moment to the tweet I published the morning after the referendum: “The people have spoken, but we don’t know what they have said”. My point there was to ask a question rather than to make a point. What, for example, did the referendum result actually tell us about the EU? Or about Europe? Why did parts of the country vote strongly for Brexit when they will be poorer as a result? Why did people so easily believe bus-borne nonsense about £350 million being returned to the NHS? How was it possible for so many people to be duped by blatant lies and deliberate manipulation (by all sides)? It is simply not clear what this result had to do with the reality of the UK’s relationship with the EU and what was about giving Westminster a kicking. After all, what many Brexiteers articulated about their resentments had little or nothing to do with the EU and everything to do with policies of austerity rooted firmly in London. The wrong dog got kicked; but, who cares?

We could leave Brexit aside for one moment and cast our eyes at a different – but related – phenomenon: the appropriation of Christianity by the Far Right. Putin is supported by the Russian Orthodox Church because he fights for Holy Russia, dislikes Muslims, and has clear views on racial distinctions. Russia is Christian, so keep Muslims down. Well, that’s a long way away, so what has Russia to do with us? Look closer to home, then. Stephen Yaxley-Lennon (aka Tommy Robinson) speaks of the “Christian identity of the West” and the EDL brandish a cross – devoid of Christian theological meaning and representative solely of an anti-Muslim identity that embraces Christendom rather than Christianity. The cross is merely a flag to be waved when ethnicity is elided with a ‘faith’ identity.

What is disturbing here, however, is that the extremes of our political discourse seem to offer clarity where complexity is too demanding. “Lock her up” and “Crooked Hilary” were not thought up on the spur of the moment by Donald Trump, but were carefully crafted as short, gripping, practical and moral. Don’t unpack them – just wind up the mob to shout them. And just keep repeating the slogans; you won’t be asked to define them, but if you are, then the askers are clearly complicit in the crookery. Trump, Farage et al are expert at using language that appeals to people who want to know that their fears, concerns and unspeakable views are understood and sympathised with. It is a classic example of ‘empathy trumping competence’. Which probably brings us back to Brexit, ferries and pizza deliveries.

Of course, all agencies in society have a responsibility to promote and embody positive, constructive and truthful discourse; but, we need to pay particular attention to the role of the media in a world where populism is rife and the manipulation of emotions as well as messages is more powerful than ever. (If you want a good overview of the changes in the media landscape in the last three decades, you could do worse than read Alan Rusbridger’s recent book Breaking News: The Remaking of Journalism and Why it Matters Now (Canongate, 2018). He tells the story of how the Guardian has had to change in the wake of digital and other technological revolutions, but its value lies in the identification and articulation of the key questions and challenges facing society today when formerly trusted media of information have been overtaken by the somewhat anarchic cultures of social media and so-called citizen journalism. He illustrates why the diminution in the number and quality of professional journalists poses dangers to truth-telling, an objective understanding of the world and events, and the holding to account of power … including powerful media organisations and manipulators.)

Nick Robinson (BBC Today programme), in the Steve Hewlett Memorial Lecture in 2017, made two points that bear repetition here: (a) “Critics of the mainstream media now see their attacks as a key part of their political strategy. In order to succeed they need to convince people not to believe ‘the news’.” (b) Attacks on the media are no longer a lazy clap line delivered to a party conference to raise the morale of a crowd of the party faithful. They are part of a guerrilla war being fought on social media day after day.”

I think Robinson is touching on a phenomenon that is more than a game for those interested in such things. When the Daily Mail identifies Supreme Court judges (doing their job independently of political masters in either the legislature or the executive) as “ENEMIES OF THE PEOPLE” and the German Alternative für Deutschland revive the Nazi insult ‘LÜGENPRESSE’, something sinister is happening. The fact that they can get away with it is frightening. There is method in this undermining of authority, intelligent analysis and commentary, and the integrity of experts in mainstream media. The populists also know that the business models that have supported such media accountability are bust; social and digital media are unaccountable, endlessly manipulable, and ideal for sloganizing brevity rather than longer, more complex analysis. Richard Gingras, Vice President of Google News, put it like this: “We came from an era of dominant news organisations, often perceived as oracles of fact. We’ve moved to a marketplace where quality journalism competes on an equal footing with raucous opinion, passionate advocacy, and the masquerading expression of variously-motivated bad actors.”

These actors, of course, include the charismatic leaders who drive populist movements and shape their cultures. These are the manipulators who themselves might well be being manipulated by other ‘actors’: think Trump and Russia, for example. Trump, Orban, Duterte, Bolsonaro: these men disrupt norms of language and behaviour, thereby portraying themselves as ‘breakers with past elites’. They perpetuate a state of crisis, promoting conspiracy theories and fearmongering, always on the offensive, on a permanent campaign to convince the populace that they are not ‘establishment’. Even when they are as elitist as you can get. Anywhere. Their approach is always negative: they are anti-intellectual, anti-establishment, anti-elite, anti democratic systems of modern government (preferring direct appeal to individuals in referendums). They are essentially authoritarian, intolerant and, frequently, amoral. And they promise big, knowing that they won’t have to deliver – people prefer big ambition to slow realism, even when they know it’s all a big fib: NHS slogans on the side of a bus; “no downsides to Brexit”; etc. As Alan Rusbridger summarises it: “Populism is a denial of complexity.” (p.93)

One more word about language and then I will attempt to say something about a Christian approach to all this stuff. I realise this won’t be accepted by those who think I am a stupid Remainer who can’t accept reality; but, I am actually trying to articulate the questions all of us – whatever we think about Brexit or Trump – need to be thinking about as our society and our world changes.

I have spoken several times in the House of Lords about “the corruption of the public discourse” and this is where these reflections coincide. As Rowan Williams illustrates in his books on Dostoyevsky and language, it is always the corruption of language and confusion of meaning that leads to the chipping away of social order and acceptable behaviour. Words are actions – language is performative. Read George Orwell’s 1984 and see how the corruption and control of language are key to the corruption and control of a populace. An unspeakable idea finally gets articulated; repetition reduces the social inhibitions that normally moderate language; the language, free of sanction, then encourages behaviour – for good or ill. Dehumanise people by categorising them, and then bad behaviour becomes not even merely permissible, but both inevitable and encouraged. Call the other tribe (or immigrants or asylum-seekers) ‘cockroaches’ and see what happens.

Behind the language lies a more concerning matter. My lifetime has coincided with philosophical developments that have not all proved to be helpful to humanity. The problem is that we now live with the consequences of philosophical assumptions that, in isolation fifty years ago, seemed noble and innocent of themselves. Take, for example, the existentialism of Sartre and Camus: I authenticate my existence by choosing. Well, that is fine if you accept that making choices is what defines a human being. Individual autonomy assumes moral frameworks that depend on individuals basically choosing to behave collectively in particular ways; but, these need not necessarily include altruism. Develop this alongside the culture of human rights and eventually you get to a different set of challenges: for example, if my individual rights (to freedom of religious expression) conflict with your human rights (to freedom of speech), who arbitrates … according to what authority … according to which criteria? Hierarchies of rights introduce new questions.

Today the questions these cultural and philosophical developments have generated have to do fundamentally with truth. Is there such a thing as ‘truth’ – that which remains true regardless of opinion or partisan affection? Or do we now prioritise opinion over truth and fact? How can Donald Trump get away with constant flip-flopping contradiction and a confident recourse to what his press spokesperson called “alternative facts”? Is the deliberate division of people into ‘us and them’ – depending on their agreement with my opinion, regardless of truth or fact – ultimately sustainable? Populism, as Jonathan Sacks has stated and we noted earlier, “has to identify an enemy” if it is to gain traction; it separates in order to oppose; it polarises and generalises, fearing difference or challenge; it serves only the interests of those who collude or whose personal interests coincide with it. After all, ‘Fake News’ is simply news that is inconvenient to my opinion, perception or interests; it is a dismissive term of abuse that needs make no reference to reality, fact, truth or objectivity.

Well, so far so good. It is not a pretty picture – even at the cursory level on which I have set the debate. Populism is a threat to an ordered society and world, not primarily because it is inconvenient to the interests of powerful elites, but because the phenomenon itself embraces and legitimises language, behaviour and moralities that are manipulable by powerful elites whose morality is unaccountable. So, how should Christians handle all this stuff?

The Bible is not neutral on the matter. When I preached on this theme at St John’s College, Cambridge, a couple of months ago I had to choose two readings. I opted for Exodus 32:1-9 (the Israelites making a golden calf while Moses was up a mountain) and Matthew 27:15-26 (where the mob call for the freeing of Barabbas instead of Jesus, and “Crucify him!” frames the “Lock her up!” of that generation. This is how I began the sermon:

It’s easy to laugh, isn’t it? A primitive people, out in the desert en route from over 400 years of oppression in Egypt towards a land of promise. Their leader, who had a habit of being somewhat singleminded when it comes to how things should be done, disappeared up a mountain for a while; and, because he didn’t come back down immediately, the people found a more emollient leader who gave them what they wanted: a golden calf to worship. So, that was quick and easy. All they had experienced, all they had learned … and they threw it away in an instant. You have to read the whole book to see that this isn’t a rare experience.

Jesus has proved to be good news to some and very bad news to others. So, when those whose security is threatened by the man from Galilee finally get him before a judge, they know how to whip up the crowd – presumably including those who have seen the transformative things Jesus has done – and “Crucify him” wins the day.

As our readings have illustrated, the challenges of destructive populism are not new.

So, here we can move on to think about what the Christian tradition might have to say in our day … in a culture that confuses patriotism with nationalism and reduces the public discourse to the trading of competing slogans devoid of substantive vision. As Adrian Pabst wrote in a recent edition of the New Statesman: “The populist insurgency sweeping the West reveals a lack of moral purpose among the main political forces… At present, none of the three main traditions offers a politics of ethical purpose, hope and meaning.”

Now, it could be argued that the Christian tradition in the West has lost its roots. The irony in the USA hardly needs spelling out: the Evangelical Right didn’t let ethics or ethical consistency stand in the way of Trump. Here in Europe Christian identity has been appropriated by political movements and associated with a narrow nationalism that threatens to cut it off from a founder who said that we should love (even) our enemy, serve and not be served, wash the feet of the undeserving, and set free those captive to hopelessness, rejection and fear.

The Moses who stayed too long up the mountain in the Exodus reading is the same Moses who had insisted that the land of promise must also be a land of generosity and justice. According to Deuteronomy 26, the people must bring to the priest the first 10% of their harvest and recite a creed that reminded them of their nomadic and dependent origins. Furthermore, they must leave the 10% around the edge of their field so that there would be something for the homeless, the hungry, the migrants and the travellers. The same Jesus they crucified in Matthew 27 is the one who had opened his mouth for those who had no voice and no dignity, and met populist bloodthirstiness with a bold silence that turned the judge into the judged.

A Christian response to populism (in the negative terms I have used for the purposes of this paper) must begin with a clear theological anthropology: human beings are made in the image of God and must not be categorised, dehumanised or relativized by language that leads to violence or rejection. But, Christian discipleship goes further – as I will illustrate briefly.

For ten years I represented the Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, at some global interfaith conferences. They did my head in. The greatest aspiration was “mutual tolerance” – particularly on the part of politicians who wanted to anaesthetise potential religious fervour (on the assumption that religions were problematic, basically all the same, but encouraged different dress and diets). Of course, they thought their own worldview was neutral and self-evidently true. Anyway, I grew to loathe the word ‘tolerance’. To tolerate someone need not involve any investment in understanding or empathising with them – the attempt to look through their eyes, hear through their ears or feel through their skin. I got bored repeating the same line year in year out: Christians are called to go beyond tolerance to love.

Now, this is the easy bit. It is easy to ask people to imitate Jesus and love their enemy as well as their friend. It’s just quite hard to do. But, unless we are to be like the German Christians (Deutsche Christen) seduced into an elision of the Kingdom of God and the Reich of Adolf Hitler, we have to learn to pay attention to those things in our society that need to be encouraged (kindness, generosity, justice and humaneness) and identify and challenge those that are destructive. Christians are called to be realists, not fantasists – loving truth (even when it is hard to discern but important to plug away at) and resisting lies, misrepresentation, manipulation and subterfuge. Lovers of light and not colluders with darkness.

This means resisting the dualisms being propagated whereby you have to be on one side of a debate or the other, but from which any nuance or subtlety or complexity is expunged. It means creating space for encounter and conversation when it seems that everyone is lobbing grenades from the trenches. It means refusing to accept the polarising premises that the ideologues represent as the only options.

Practically and as a priority, however, we can pay attention to the language we use in shaping the discourse in a collapsing society. I lead for the bishops in the House of Lords on Europe, so have spent a considerable amount of time on Brexit and the fierce debates in Parliament. I have repeatedly pleaded for our legislature to watch its language and do something to redeem our articulated common life. Everyone agrees, but many then promptly revert to the categorising and mudslinging. I could illustrate this at length.

But, the Christian tradition has something more to offer in these current dangerous circumstances of division and insecurity and growing fear: hope.

The Old Testament book of Proverbs is often quoted: “Without a vision the people perish.” So, what is the vision being offered to the people of our islands, for example, as we prepare to leave the European Union? (Or not. Who knows?) And, if we do have a vision, how is it to be expressed? For, if the devil has all the good music, the populists have all the good slogans. The Brexit debate is not about political vision or substance; it is not rational or about reality – just look at the actual consequences already; it is visceral and emotional. Poor people might well get considerably poorer, but many would still vote to leave, anyway.

But, Christians are not driven by fear; we are drawn by hope. A hope that comes to us from the future – resurrection. It is a hope that should not be confused with fantasy. It commits to the life of the present – in all its complexity and muckiness – but refuses to see the present reality as the end or the ultimate. It takes a long-term view with a reckless courage that even dares to sing the songs of Yahweh while sitting in exile on the banks of Babylon’s rivers, being mocked by those whose vision is short. It is a hope that sees ‘now’ in the light of eternity and declines to build – let alone worship – golden calves. It is a hope that, in the face of baying crowds, will still cry out for justice. It is a hope that knows what was whispered at Christmas: “The light has come into the world, and the darkness cannot overcome it.”

There is a desperate need for a younger generation to find the language for a new narrative for our politics and our common life here and in the world. A new narrative rooted in the old story … of God and his people, of the apparent bloody failure of a cross planted in a rubbish tip, and of the haunting whisper of a song of resurrection. It might take some time and we might fail a million times. But, we know there is more to be said before the conversation ends.

I concluded my sermon in Cambridge with this: Maybe our slogan ought to be: “Let there be light”. I believe it. But, we have an obligation and a challenge to turn this permissive concept (slogan?) into practical reality. If Adrian Pabst, Rowan Williams and Michael Sandel are right in their critiques of current forms of populism and the roots that have allowed these to flourish, then Christians – not just bishops in the House of Lords – must address some honest questions and take responsibility for resisting darkness and shining light, the light of the Christ who was on the receiving end of the mob’s “Crucify him!”. Our manifesto must be rooted in that which fired up Jesus as he began his public ministry in Luke 4; or the Beatitudes in Matthew 5; or the Ten Commandments which frame the obligations and inhibitions that enable a free society to thrive – including not misrepresenting your neighbour’s case.

This last reference might just push Christians to question the dualistic language being used to perpetuate a common sense of crisis, and to divide people according to notions of who is in and who is out. We need to listen for the voices of those who are silent or have no voice. We must resist those who offer simplistic (but emotionally appealing) solutions to complex questions – even if the complexity is boggling to us. We must question what we are being fed through media, and question which values are being driven by which people, especially when charismatic leaders are involved. We must insist on integrity, on consistency within clear moral frameworks, on the place of head over heart when making big decisions that have consequences for many people. (Can we think of a single Brexiteer who will suffer personally from a disastrous Brexit?)

But, I want to conclude with what might sound like an odd appeal. Politics is a rough old game. Christians should not be afraid of rough politics. I don’t mean to encourage the ad hominem bitchiness that targets individuals, questions their motives at every turn, and abuses them with language that dehumanises. I don’t mean to invite slanging matches between firmly convinced opinionators whose ignorance is exposed by a couple of sharp questions. I do mean to encourage engagement with the detail of political decision-making at every level. Those who represent us in our parliamentary (and local) democracy need our prayers and our encouragement. They need to know they can trust Christians to listen and tell the truth (as they see it). They also need to know that we can argue a case on the grounds of that case without resorting to easy slogan or dismissive attack. Yes, we can call out inconsistency between articulated policy and delivered reality; but, we can also encourage where hard and costly decisions are made, often with limited foresight and contested will.

Christians must love the light by looking at the world – and our politics, and our media – in the light of the Christ who is the light of the world. Don’t just look at Jesus – look at the world through his eyes, say what you see – always with the humility that we might be myopic or wilfully blind – and be trustworthy and faithful.

Viktor Fankl addresses where “freedom threatens to degenerate into mere licence and arbitrariness unless it is lived in terms of responsibleness” and suggests that the Statue of Liberty on the East Coast of the USA should be supplemented by a Statue of Responsibility on the West Coast. It is unlikely to happen; but, Christians should be at the forefront of holding these together at a time when there are powerful moves to drive them apart.

My last word before questions and discussion refers to two book titles by the American Old Testament theologian Walter Brueggemann: Hopeful Imagination and The Prophetic Imagination. Christians are called – in whatever time and place they live – to be people of hope, to imagine a different way and to live it. Prophetic living is not gazing into a crystal ball and guessing what the future might hold; rather, it is looking at the present in the light of the past and resolving to be faithful to God and his call whatever the future might hold.

Advertisements

It’s really hot and humid here in Novi Sad, Serbia. This morning threatened thunder and rain, but it’s ended up being just … er … hot and humid. Fortunately, the 500 people in the conference centre don’t have to sit too closely together.

The theme yesterday was ‘hospitality’; today’s is ‘justice’. We began with a Bible study on 1 Kings 21 (Naboth and the art of hiding behind the law when you do terrible things) by a Brazilian theologian, Dr Elaine Neuenfeldt. This was followed by a young German lawyer, Lisa Schneider, speaking (in German) both thematically and practically about justice – her main plea being that the church should never try offering young people simple solutions to complex questions. She stressed the need for young people to see the church demonstrating authenticity (‘practise what you preach, or just stop preaching sort of thing’) – young people, she said, are passionate about truth and justice.

A Swiss Methodist bishop, Dr Patrick Streiff, reflected on this (in French). I found his final point the most interesting: an over-preoccupation with the language of values ignores the actual root of Christian relationship: our unity in Christ. He observed that in many official comment on social themes we refer to “Christian values for Europe”:

Certes, il est nécessaire que les Églises participent au dialogue – et parfois dispute – sur des valeurs. Mais parler des valeurs se base déjà sur une certaine abstraction de ce qui est au cœur de notre foi. Notre foi ne se base pas sur des valeurs, mais sur le Dieu trinitaire qui s’est révélé à nous et dont la relation avec lui se répercute dans certaines valeurs qui nous sont chères.

In other words, Christian faith is rooted in the trinitarian God, not an abstract set of values. He then illustrated this in the following way:

Dernièrement, en Autriche, après une entrevue du ministre avec tous les dirigeants des religions officiellement reconnues, le ministre voulait encore voir le sanctuaire dans notre immeuble méthodiste. Le surintendant le lui a montré et expliqué qu’il y a une paroisse de langue allemande et une paroisse de langue anglaise qui se réunissent chaque dimanche, avec des personnes d’une trentaine de nations. Le ministre était étonné, puis a dit : « oui, il semble que c’est possible si on a les même valeurs ». Un peu plus tard et à nouveau seul, le surintendant s’est dit : « Ce n’est pas vrai. Ces gens ont des valeurs souvent très différentes, mais ils se réunissent ici à cause de leur foi en Christ. »

He concludes with this question: “How are we to witness to that which lies at the heart of our faith when we address ethical questions?”

The point is that Christians in Europe inhabit different cultural and political contexts, these arising from different histories of conflict and loss. Serbian Orthodox Christians will have a different approach to Kosovo, Muslims and justice from that of a Welsh Presbyterian (for example). Our perspectives and values (such as justice, reconciliation and the conditions these demand) might be seen differently depending on our communal experience; what unites Christians is our unity in Christ – which is shaped like a cross before which we must be repentantly hopeful. Unity of relationship and mutual obligation is not the same as unanimity of opinion on values.

In the light of this, this amazingly international and multilingual conference went on to address head on challenges to the future of Europe. No fantasy here, but, rather, a head-on articulation of the hard challenges facing Europe in the light of corruption, populist nationalism, and the collapse of a common vision.

On that cheerful note, we move on to business.

I am in Novi Sad in Serbia for the General Assembly of the Conference of European Churches. The shadow in which 500 Christians from a vast range of churches meet is a rapidly changing Europe. The first day has concentrated on the Christian obligation to offer hospitality to the stranger – pertinent in the face of populist nationalism, mass migration, the corruption of the public (and political) discourse, and the easy equation of the common good with mere economics and self-protection.

However, this is no abstract conversation between lefty snowflakes about bleeding-heart do-gooding; rather, it is intelligent and informed, led by speakers and contributors who are deeply engaged in practical hospitality for refugees and migrants in places like Syria, Iraq, Greece – places on the front line of bitter suffering.

Following a Bible study on Genesis 18:1-8 (Abraham and the strangers who visited him at Mamre), the Patriarch of Antioch made an impassioned yet measured justification for Christians to care for strangers as a biblical imperative. This theme runs through the Bible and rests on the reminder that “we all were slaves once”. Jesus was unequivocal on his own identification with the stranger, the refugee and the dispossessed (look at Matthew 25 for starters).

This is why it is so depressing that in the Brexit debates in Parliament and the media the sole preoccupation seems to be with economics, trade deals and money. Human value, social good, cultural richness – the soul of a society – get forgotten. People are more than cogs in an economic machine; society must be more than simply a functioning economy. For whose benefit does an economy exist? Or, to put it differently, does the economy exist for people, or do people exist to serve the interests of an economy?

The language we use usually gives away the truth of our response to these questions.

Given the contrast between Abraham (the nomad who offers hospitality to the strangers at Mamre in Genesis 18) and the people of Sodom and Gomorrah (who abused hospitality by trying to exploit the strangers/guests), it is perhaps understandable that the stand-out sentence in this morning’s sessions was to the effect that “maybe today’s Sodomites are those who preach against hospitality to the refugees and migrants”.

Discuss.

This is the script of this morning’s Thought for the Day on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

It’s harvest time again, and all over the land churches are desperately trying to find something new to say about creation, cultivation and deprivation. A bit like the vegetables and flowers on display, it’s a big challenge to keep it all fresh.

Yet, telling the story afresh assumes that everybody already knows what harvest is about. And I wonder if this assumption might be false.

I grew up in a city where the answer to the question “Where does milk come from?” was likely to get the answer “the supermarket”. Then we would get some entertaining, but muddled, account of how we might not actually plough the fields and scatter the good seed on the land”, but someone did. And we would be grateful – particularly because we didn’t have to do the dirty work.

But, harvest goes deeper than this. If all too often our connection with the land has been broken, then we need more than stories to reconnect us to where our food comes from. What most religions offer is ritual – celebrations that remind us of relationships.

Nearly three thousand years ago the recently liberated Jewish people were about to enter the land they believed had been promised to them. Yet, along with words of encouragement and comfort went words of warning like this: When you get established in this land you will soon prosper. You will build your houses, cultivate your fields and grow your wealth. Then you will begin to forget that you once had nothing and could not save yourselves. It won’t be long before you start exploiting other people. So, the cycle of each year is going to be shaped by rituals that will compel you to re-member, re-tell and re-enact the story of your dependence … on God, the earth and each other.

Not very exciting, you might think. But, take just one of these annual rituals – the one that sees you bringing the first ten percent of your harvest to the priest and reciting a creed that begins with the words: “My father was a wandering Aramaean…”. In other words, you once were a nomad, dependent on the land and other people. You remember that you inherited creation, not as a commodity to be consumed or traded, but a gift to be cultivated and shared. You don’t own it; you are to be responsible for stewarding it for the good of the earth and its people.

And, to rub it in, you must leave the ten percent of crops around the edge of the field so that the travellers, the homeless and the hungry can help themselves to food.

Harvest, then, confronts us with our obligations to the earth and each other. It challenges our ethics and our economic priorities. And it reconnects us with the simple fact of our mortality and mutuality.

This is the script of this morning’s Thought for the Day, hastily re-written in the light of this morning’s news of an attack on Muslims coming out of a mosque in London.

The disturbing news from London this morning in which Muslims leaving a mosque have been directly attacked shows that violence can strike at any time and anywhere, and we think especially of those who suffer today.

But, it comes after a weekend of remarkable events that demonstrate the unity of diverse communities. Not only the deeply compassionate response of ordinary people to the plight of those caught up in the Grenfell Tower fire, but also the Great Get Together. Thousands of people have got together in local communities not just to remember and honour Jo Cox, the MP killed a year ago here in West Yorkshire, but to demonstrate that difference does not necessarily mean division.

All this raises questions that not everybody feels comfortable addressing. Such as to how an emphasis on commonality enables us to be honest about the differences between us? Or, conversely, whether praise of diversity inadvertently closes down honest discussion about what makes us distinctive.

I spent a decade working in global interfaith conferences in places like Kazakhstan and Turkey. They sometimes reminded me of that old BT commercial that ended with, “It’s good to talk”. I sometimes wanted to add “… as long as you don’t talk about anything.” It sometimes felt like the root political assumption underlying them was that all religions are basically the same – we just have different diets and dress sense. So, we should ignore these superficial differences in order to become the same and safe. I constantly had to do the unpopular thing and insist that if we didn’t recognise the differences, then we were being neither honest nor realistic, and the enterprise would not hold up when put under pressure.

But, as events in London last night suggest, coming together and talking are only the beginning – not an end. These things are complex.
When Jo Cox said in her maiden speech in the House of Commons that we have more in common than that which divides us, she was surely right. But, the genius of what her husband Brendan has done (in focusing on that commonality and compassion) lies in creating space for relationships to be made within which our differences can then be explored honestly.

In other words, we need both – common ground and vibrant diversity. What is often called ‘the common good’ actually creates space for difference to be expressed and lived with, and within agreed limits.

As the prophet Jeremiah recognised when urging exiled people to pray for the welfare of the city where they lived, a mature society is one in which difference can be owned whilst the common good is built up. But, this has to begin with getting and being together in a recognised and respectful common humanity – a responsibility for all. This has to characterise our response today.

This is the script of this morning’s Thought for the Day on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme in the wake of Saturday’s terrorist attack in London.

Borough Market in London is a place I used to know well when I lived just a few miles away. Go down any time and it was like being drowned in smells and sounds and languages from around the planet. I once bumped into a television news foreign correspondent by a cheese stall – a man normally seen in a war zone somewhere remote. I wondered – but was too shy to ask – how he coped with moving between the two worlds: the world of unspeakable violence in parts of the Middle East and the world of safe, domesticated ordinariness of home.

This weekend the two worlds collided once again in the brutality of extremist violence on an ordinary evening in an extraordinary city. Two weeks ago it was Manchester, last week Coptic Christians in Egypt, this week mourners at a funeral in Kabul, and a day ago people getting ready for another working week in London.

Perhaps the most uttered prayer – even on the lips of those who claim no faith – might be that of Psalm 13: “How long, O Lord, how long…?” How are we to respond to yet another act of cowardly violence, and the prospect of more to come?

Borough Market runs alongside Southwark Cathedral – a place not just of prayer, but that attests to the reality of human life in all its colour. Here it is that Chaucer’s pilgrims met before embarking on their journey to Canterbury. Chaucer was clearly at pains to bring together a motley group of diverse people who had stories to tell, lives to share, fears to explore, deaths to face. They spare no hiding places as they walk and talk and laugh and weep and wonder at what it means to be mortal. Read Chaucer and there’s no escape from the fact that the freedom to love brings with it the freedom to hate; that the freedom to worship brings the freedom to mock the objects of another person’s adoration or value; that the freedom to fear accompanies the freedom to hope.

For some people freedom is precisely the problem: why doesn’t God stop it all? For others, prayer is the problem: if these crazy people would be rational, then they wouldn’t do these terrible things. But, prayer, even if it involves us opening our hearts to an expression of all we desire, is primarily an exposing of ourselves to reality: the reality that we are mortal, that loving in the face of murder seems weak, that giving in to the cycle of violence and retribution does nothing to solve the problem.

When people say they are praying for London, they will mean different things. But, for me and other Christians at least, it involves commitment to all the world can throw at us, never exemption from it. Like the man on the cross at Calvary, this commitment refuses to give violence, death and destruction the final word.

This is the text of this morning’s Bible Study in Jena as contribution to Kirchentag auf dem Weg. (I don’t have time to translate it, but will try to do a summary later.)

Kirchentag auf dem Weg, Jena, 27 Mai 2017
Bibelarbeit

Esau versöhnt sich mit Jakob: Genesis 33:1-17

Gleich am Anfang dieser Bibelarbeit möchte ich drei Fragen stellen. Oberflächlich scheinen diese Fragen ziemlich einfach zu verstehen, aber, wie wir langsam entdecken werden, sind sie in der Realität irgendwie komplizierter.

Die erste Frage heißt: wie wichtig sind Gesichter?

Die zweite Frage heißt: wann sollten wir mit Gott und mit uns selbst kämpfen?

Und die dritte Frage heißt: wie kann ich entdecken, was für einen Segen Gott mir geben will?

In einigen Minuten kommen wir zu diesen Fragen zurück. Aber zuerst müssen wir über Familienverhältnisse, Geschwister und Schmerz nachdenken.

Ich habe zwei Brüder und zwei Schwestern: Ich trage die Narben des Familienlebens. Ich bin in Liverpool aufgewachsen; zumindest war der Fußball gut.

Als ich ein Kind war, spielten wir ein Kartenspiel namens Happy Families. Bei diesem Spiel kämpften wir regelmäßig miteinander. Meine Familie war trotzdem glücklich. Aber als ich älter wurde, begann ich zu erkennen, dass nicht alle Familien glücklich sind. Wie wir auf Englisch sagen: “Du kannst deine Freunde wählen, aber deine Familie nicht.“

Wenn wir über Familienspannungen oder -probleme sprechen, denken wir zum Beispiel an Ödipus und seine Mutter – oder an Romulus und Remus. Dostojewski beschreibt in seiner Darstellung der Brüder Karamasow die Herausforderungen des brüderlichen Konflikts. Aber es war Sigmund Freud, der anfing, darüber nachzudenken, was er “Geschwister-Rivalität” nannte und damit viele psychologische, verhaltens- und soziale Probleme im Boden der wettbewerbsfähigen Brüder und Schwestern verwurzelte. Es ist in diesem Zusammenhang, dass wir normalerweise über die Spannung und Rivalität zwischen Jakob und Esau nachdenken.

Geschwister-Rivalität ist immer unangenehm. Zu oft – und besonders in der Kirche – nehmen wir Bilder des Familienlebens an, die harmonisch, liebevoll und großzügig sind; dennoch ist für viele Menschen die Familie eine Quelle von Spannung, Enttäuschung und Angst – sogar von Gewalt. Im Vereinigten Königreich müssen zu dieser Zeit fast 60,000 Kinder vor Missbrauch geschützt werden.

Aber in unserer Bibellesung treffen wir Jakob und Esau. Zwei Brüder, die einander so sehr „lieben“, dass ihre Namen häufig mit Betrug, gebrochenen Beziehungen, Groll und der Menge der Behaarung verbunden sind. Von den gleichen Eltern abstammend, ist diese Familie so dysfunktional, dass sie nach Bevorzugung, versteckten Angeboten und Lügen riecht. Nach Jahrzehnten der Auseinandersetzung suchen die beiden Brüder schließlich Versöhnung, aber dies mit unterschiedlichen Annahmen darüber, wie der andere antworten wird.

Und bevor wir weiter gehen, möchte ich noch eine weitere einfache Frage stellen, auf die ich die Antwort nicht kenne. Der Titel dieser Bibelarbeit ist “Esau versöhnt sich mit Jakob”; warum nicht: “Jakob versöhnt sich mit Esau”?

Der ehemalige Oberrabbiner Lord Jonathan Sacks glaubt, dass die Geschwister-Rivalität uns die passende – die richtige – Linse liefert, durch die wir nicht nur die Welt betrachten und verstehen können, in der wir derzeit leben – denke an den sogenannten „Islamischen Staat“, Israel-Palästina und so weiter -, sondern auch einige der biblischen Texte, die für unser Verständnis der Bibel und die Grundaussagen unseres Glaubens am wichtigsten sind. Nicht in erster Linie die Beziehung zwischen Eltern und Kind, sondern zwischen Bruder und Bruder, Schwester und Schwester, Schwester und Bruder.

In seinem wichtigen Buch Nicht in Gottes Namen überprüft Jonathan Sacks die Geschichten von Genesis, und zieht einige sehr interessante Schlussfolgerungen daraus. Dann wendet er diese Schlussfolgerungen auf einige der dringlichsten Rivalitäten der Welt an: Israeliten und Palästinenser, Muslime und Juden, und so weiter. Was wirklich liegt im Kern solcher gewalttätigen und konkurrenzhaften Beziehungen? Woher kommt der Hass? Welche sind die Erzählungen – oft bloß angenommen, anstatt artikuliert -, die das Selbstverständnis der Menschen gestalten, die ihren Nachbarn töten würden, um Recht zu behalten oder ihre Rechte zu behaupten? Warum werden eine gemeinsame Menschlichkeit und eine respektvolle menschliche Gegenseitigkeit so leicht durch einen Überlegenheitsdrang vertrieben?

Wir werden zu diesen Fragen gleich zurückkommen, aber zuerst müssen wir die Geschichte überdenken, in der sich unser Text – die Versöhnung von Jakob und Esau – befindet. Und wenn wir diese Grundgeschichten unseres Glaubens wieder betrachten, können wir vielleicht die Worte des irischen Dramatikers George Bernard Shaw bedenken, der sagte: “Wenn Sie das Familienskelett nicht loswerden können, dann können Sie es auch tanzen lassen.”

Nun, bevor wir das tun, lasst mich eine Randbemerkung machen. Ich habe vor einigen Jahren bemerkt, dass Prediger zu oft Predigten über isolierte Passagen halten, ohne diese Passage in ihren größeren Kontext zu setzen – das ist ein bisschen wie ein Fragment eines Gemäldes anzuschauen, ohne das ganze Bild zu zeigen, in das es passt und was ihm Sinn gibt. Also habe ich angefangen, die Geschichte der ganzen Bibel in einer Minute zu erzählen (wobei ich natürlich ein paar Details weglassen muss). Wenn ich in England in der Gemeinde sage, dass ich das jetzt tun werde, sehen sie mich mit herausfordernden Augen an. Als ich das zum ersten Mal in deutscher Sprache im Berliner Dom sagte, schauten hunderte Deutsche ihre Armbanduhr an. Am Ende des Gottesdienstes schüttelte ich die Hände von Hunderten von Leuten, die mir fröhlich mitteilten, dass meine Erzählung eine Minute vier Sekunden gedauert hatte. Ich fragte mich, wie lautet die deutsche Übersetzung vom englischen ‘get a life’?

Die traditionelle Geschichte von Jakob und Esau geht so:

Isaak, der Vater ist alt und blind. Seine Frau hat einen Lieblingssohn, Jakob, aber er ist der zweite Sohn und hat daher keinen Anspruch auf das Erbe, wenn Isaak stirbt. So überzeugt sie Jakob, seinen Vater zu täuschen und den Segen zu beanspruchen, der seinem älteren Bruder Esau übertragen werden sollte. Vater Isaak wird getäuscht, Jakob bekommt den Segen, Esau geht leer aus, da ist eine riesige Menge an Elend und Wut, und die Familie ist zerrissen. Jahrzehntelang sehen sich die Brüder nicht. Sie heiraten, haben ihre Familien, machen ihr Geschäft und halten sich auseinander. Dann, eines Tages, versuchen sie, alles aufzuholen. Sie versöhnen sich miteinander.

Aber, ich stelle die Frage: geht die Geschichte wirklich so?

Wir sind mit einer bestimmten Erzählung des Segens vertraut – eine Erzählung, die man auf Englisch nennt: Either-Or (Entweder-Oder). Wenn Abel gesegnet ist, dann kann Kain nicht gesegnet sein. Wenn Isaak gesegnet ist, dann muss Ismael verflucht sein. Wenn Jakob den Segen stiehlt, dann ist Esau dessen beraubt worden. Es kann nur einen Gewinner geben – was wir in englischer Sprache “a Zero-sum game” (ein “Nullsummenspiel”) nennen, in dem, wie Abba es so merkwürdig ansah, “der Sieger alles nimmt” (“The winner takes it all”).

Aber ich möchte heute Morgen vorschlagen, dass dies ein Missverständnis des Textes darstellt.

Also jetzt müssen wir zum Anfang zurück gehen, und den Kontext beschreiben, in den die Versöhnung von Jakob und Esau passt. Das dauert länger als eine Minute. Und die Geschichte geht so:

Gott schafft alles, was ist, und denkt, es ist wunderbar. Die Welt wird geschaffen, um fruchtbar zu sein – eine Welt, die sich schafft – und Gott segnet zuerst die Lebewesen der Luft und des Wassers (1:22, der fünfte Tag), dann als nächstes Tiere und Menschen (1: 24-31, der sechste Tag).

Wie ihr wisst, gibt es zwei Schöpfungserzählungen in der Genesis, und sie erzählen die gleiche Geschichte aus verschiedenen Blickwinkeln. Hier lesen wir Poesie und Metapher, die sich mit der ewigen Frage beschäftigt, die das menschliche Bewusstsein verfolgt: warum bin ich – warum sind wir – eigentlich hier, und was ist der Sinn der menschlichen Existenz? Der Punkt ist, dass Gott seine Schöpfung liebt und sie segnet. Aber die Freiheit bringt immer ein Risiko mit sich. Die Freiheit der Erde, fruchtbar zu sein, bedeutet auch, dass Zellen mutieren. Die Freiheit des Menschen, Gott, die Welt und andere Menschen zu lieben, bedeutet auch, dass sie den Hass wählen dürfen. Das Ergebnis ist die Möglichkeit, die die Bibel “Sünde” nennt.

Dann, in Genesis Kapitel 4, begegnen wir der ersten Familienbeziehung, und es ist kein Modell von Harmonie, Freude, Liebe und Frieden. Unsere erste Familienerfahrung ist ängstlich: Rivalität, Konkurrenz, Eifersucht, Reibung, Wut, Gewalt.

Nun, wenn ich gebeten werde, ein “biblisches Modell der Familie” zu wahren, muss ich fragen, ob dies eingeschlossen ist.

Kain und Abel, die zwei Söhne von Adam und Eva. Kain ermordet seinen Bruder Abel. Als nächstes vertreibt Gott Kain aus dem Land und die Menschen werden ruhelos wandern – immer unterwegs, und verfolgt von der Vergangenheit. Und doch … und doch … Gott schützt den Sünder: “Der Herr legte ein Zeichen auf Kain, damit niemand, der auf ihn kam, ihn töten würde.” (4:15) (Leider haben wir jetzt keine Zeit, um zu erforschen, was der französische Jurist und Theologe Jacques Ellul in seinem wunderbaren Buch von 1962 “Die Bedeutung der Stadt” nannte – was es bedeutet, “eine Stadt zu bauen”, die in einer ansonsten konturlosen Wüste der menschlichen Existenz ein Gefühl von Zugehörigkeit und Bedeutung gibt.) Aber, wie die Geschichte entfaltet, sind wir mit einem total unsentimentalen Bild vom Menschen konfrontiert, das sich weigert, von der zerstörerischen Kraft des Neides, der Rivalität, der Freiheit und der Sünde wegzuschauen.

Ihr kennt schon die Geschichte von Noah und der großen Flut. Zum Schluss segnet Gott noch einmal, und macht einen Bund mit den Menschen und der Erde. Aus der Zerstörung kommt Erlösung und Hoffnung. Aber es verlangt von den Menschen auch, dass sie der ursprünglichen menschlichen Verpflichtung treu bleiben, “fruchtbar zu sein und sich zu vermehren”. Zu diesem sogenannten “kulturellen Mandat” gehört auch eine relationale Verpflichtung – eine Forderung nach Treue und Kreativität für das Gemeinwohl der Welt.

Und jetzt nimmt die Geschichte eine überraschende Wendung. Kapitel 12 beginnt mit der Erzählung, die sich noch einmal auf ein einziges Paar konzentriert. Zuerst waren es Adam und Eva, jetzt sind es Abram und Sarai. Gott macht ihnen ein scheinbar lächerliches Versprechen (12: 2-3) und segnet sie. Kein Wunder, dass, wie die Geschichte fortschreitet, sowohl Abram als auch Sarai mehrmals über Gott lachen.

Und hier wird die Vorstellung des Landbesitzes wichtig. Adam wurde der Garten gegeben, Kain wurde in die Wüste verbannt, alles Land wurde unter Noah sauber gewaschen. Aber als die Geschichte wieder neu beginnt, geht es schon wieder um Gott und die Menschen, die in einem Bund zwischen Gott, den Menschen und der Erde gesegnet werden. Den Menschen wird von Gott geboten, das Land unter Gott zu kultivieren, immer um des Gemeinwohls willen. Wenn es Hungersnot in meinem Land gibt, kann ich in ein anderes Land ziehen und dort Segen und Sicherheit suchen. Das Land gehört immer Gott.

Aber alles geht schief. Es gibt schlechte Menschen in der Welt. Und Abram wird durch das lachhafte Versprechen verfolgt: Gottes Welt wird durch ihn gesegnet. Segen und Fruchtbarkeit, aber keine Kinder und keine Zukunft.

Wer annimmt, dass die Bibel religiöse Phantasie repräsentiert, um die Menschen über die Realität einer harten Welt hinweg zu trösten, hat klar den Text niemals gelesen.

Und dann kommt die Überraschung: Gottes Segen hängt davon ab, dass Sarai Kinder hat – aber sie ist unfruchtbar. Sarai will nicht noch länger warten, und gibt Abram ihr ägyptisches Sklavenmädchen Hagar, und Hagar ist fruchtbar. Das Verhältnis der Macht zwischen Sarai und Hagar ist gebrochen und Hagar wird in die Wüste vertrieben, wo sie zugibt, dass sie davonläuft und nicht dahinläuft. Aber der Engel des Herrn sagt, sie solle zurückkehren und sich wieder Sarai unterwerfen.

Allerdings liegt der Schlüssel in dem folgenden Vers (16:10): “Der Engel des Herrn sprach zu ihr: “Ich will deine Nachkommen so mehren, dass sie der großen Menge wegen nicht gezählt werden können.” Ismael, ihr Sohn, wird eine besondere Berufung in der Welt haben. Nicht die gleiche Berufung wie sein noch unbekannter Halbbruder Isaak, sondern eine von Gott gegebene Berufung.

Nach einer ganzen Reihe von Kapiteln über diese Eltern geht eines Tages Sarai zum Sozialdienstbüro, um ihre Rente abzuholen, aber kommt mit ihrem Mutterschaftsgeld zurück: Ihr Junge ist endlich geboren. Und nach 21:9 hat sich der Teenager Ismael mit dem kleinen Halbbruder Isaac gut verstanden – und anstatt dies zu feiern, wird Sarai eifersüchtig.

Die Worte von Sarah müssen beachtet werden: “Der Sohn dieser Sklavenfrau soll nicht erben mit meinem Sohn Isaak (21:10).” Das ist es: Wettbewerbsfähigkeit; Nachteil gegen den anderen; Entweder-oder; Der Gewinner nimmt alles.

Aber Gott sagt Abraham: “Nach Isaak soll dein Geschlecht genannt werden. Aber auch den Sohn der Magd will ich zu einem Volk machen, weil er dein Sohn ist. “(21:13) Und Gott spricht zur verstörten und verbannten Hagar: ” Gott hat die Stimme des Knaben dort gehört, wo er liegt… Ich will ihn zum großen Volk machen.” (21: 17-18)

Versteht ihr? Beide werden gesegnet. Der Schriftsteller von Genesis erzählt uns etwas Subtiles – etwas, das die normalen menschlichen Annahmen über Segen und Fluch überschreitet.

Wir haben nicht genug Zeit, die Episode anzupacken, als Abraham seine Bereitschaft zeigt, seinen Sohn, Isaak, zu opfern. Aber noch einmal hören wir Gottes Versprechen an Abraham über Isaak: “Weil du solches getan hast und hast deines einzigen Sohnes nicht verschont, will ich dich segnen und deine Nachkommen mehren wie die Sterne am Himmel und wie den Sand am Ufer des Meeres, und deine Nachkommen sollen die Tore ihrer Feinde besitzen; und durch deine Nachkommen sollen alle Völker auf Erden gesegnet werden, weil du meiner Stimme gehorcht hast. “(22: 16-18) Die Nachkommen von Isaak werden ein Segen für die Welt sein. Gott verspricht nicht Reichtum und Wohlstand, sondern dass dieses Volk eine Quelle sein wird – ein Transportmittel – zum Segen für andere.

Also geht die Geschichte weiter. Sarah stirbt, Isaak geht auf die Jagd nach einer Frau, alles klappt, und Rebekka bekommt einen Mann, der sie liebt (24:67) – das war gut, weil er seine Mutter vermisst hatte. Der alte Mann Abraham heiratet wieder, dann stirbt er.
Nun endlich kommen wir zu der Geschichte von Esau und Jakob. Aber nachdem wir die Geschichte auf diese Weise untersucht haben, können wir jetzt den Rahmen sehen, in den die Geschichte der beiden Brüder passen wird: Beide können gesegnet werden, aber sie werden nicht denselben Segen bekommen.

Seid ihr noch da?

Die Geschichte von Esau und Jakob ist eine Geschichte von Betrug, Verrat und dem falschen Anspruch auf das, wozu Jakob nicht berechtigt ist – weil er den Segen eines anderen haben will, und nicht den Segen, der ihm gehört: Verkaufe mir dein Geburtsrecht für eine Schüssel Suppe. Der blinde Vater Isaak segnet den falschen Sohn.

“Siehe, der Geruch meines Sohnes ist wie der Geruch des Feldes, das der Herr gesegnet hat. Gott gebe dir vom Tau des Himmels und vom Fett der Erde und Korn und Wein die Fülle. Völker sollen dir dienen, und Stämme sollen dir zu Füßen fallen. Sei ein Herr über deine Brüder, und deiner Mutter Söhne sollen dir zu Füßen fallen. Verflucht sei, wer dir flucht; gesegnet sei, wer dich segnet! “(27: 27-29)

So hat Jakob den Segen erhalten, der für seinen Bruder bestimmt war.

Dann kommt Esau herein, entdeckt den Betrug und ist verstört. “Vater: Segne mich auch, mein Vater!”, ruft er (27:34). “Hast du mir denn keinen Segen vorbehalten?” (27:36) “Hast du denn nur einen Segen, mein Vater? Segne mich auch, mein Vater! “(27:38) Und Esau weinte. Und warum eigentlich nicht. Seine Welt ist zu Ende. Sogar seine Identität wird jetzt in Frage gestellt.

Aber bemerkt ihr das, was in 27:39-40 folgt, wie sein Vater auf die Klage des beraubten Sohnes antwortet: “Siehe, du wirst wohnen fern vom Fett der Erde und fern vom Tau, der vom Himmel kommt. Von deinem Schwerte wirst du dich nähren, und deinem Bruder sollst du dienen. Aber es wird geschehen, dass du einmal sein Joch von deinem Halse reißen wirst.” Diese Ungerechtigkeit, ohne Flucht vor ihren Implikationen und Konsequenzen, ist nicht das Ende der Geschichte, Esau. Segen gibt es noch.

Die Brüder gehen ihre verschiedenen Wege. In ihren Ehen klingt etwas wider von Isaak und Ismael (28:1-9).

Aber das ist die Geschichte von dem, was passiert, wenn jemand seinen eigenen Segen – seine eigene Berufung – nicht akzeptieren will, und sich nach dem Segen eines anderen sehnt – in der Regel eines anderen, der eng mit ihm verwandt ist. Der Fokus liegt auf Jakob, nicht auf dem verletzten Esau. Nach einigen Jahrzehnten nach der Trennung hat Jakob einen Traum, in dem wir die Begriffe von Gottes Segen beachten sollten:

“Ich bin der Herr, der Gott deines Vaters Abraham, und Isaaks Gott; das Land, darauf du liegst, will ich dir und deinen Nachkommen geben. Und dein Geschlecht soll werden wie der Staub auf Erden, und du sollst ausgebreitet werden gegen Westen und Osten, Norden und Süden und durch dich und deine Nachkommen sollen alle Geschlechter auf Erden gesegnet werden. Und siehe, ich bin mit dir und will dich behüten, wo du hinziehst, und will dich wieder herbringen in dies Land. Denn ich will dich nicht verlassen, bis ich alles tue, was ich dir zugesagt habe.” (28:13-15)

Und Jakob wusste, dass dieser Segen nicht der war, den er von Esau gestohlen hatte. Esau sollte Reichtum haben und das Land besitzen; Jakob sollte die Quelle des Segens aller Völker werden. Das heißt zwei verschiedene Segen.

Jakob heiratet dann zwei Schwestern unter merkwürdigen Umständen, und noch einmal gibt es Geschwister-Rivalität über Fruchtbarkeit. Schon wieder.

Während der Jahre mit seinem Schwiegervater Laban und seinen Frauen bekommt er viele Kinder und viel Reichtum. Er täuscht auch seinen Schwiegervater (30: 37-43). Jakob kann man nicht vertrauen. Er würde nicht für das Ordinationstraining in der Kirche von England ausgewählt werden. Aber hier ist der Punkt, dass der gestohlene Segen erfüllt ist, obwohl er gestohlen wurde. Gott ist seinen Versprechen in einer kompromittierten Welt treu, die von kompromittierten Menschen bewohnt wird.

Jakob flieht mit diesen Frauen und Kindern – und mit den Sachen, die Rachel von ihrem Vater Laban gestohlen hat. Es folgen weitere Täuschungen. Laban findet die Familie, fordert Jakob über die Diebstähle heraus, und Jakob antwortet mit einem Haufen von selbstmitleidigen, selbsterklärenden emotionalen Erpressungen. Jakob und Laban trennen sich.

Nun kommen wir zu unserer Geschichte und fast zu dem Text vor uns. Jakob schickt seine Boten, um Esau zu finden und um ein Treffen zwischen den beiden längst entfremdeten Brüdern vorzubereiten. Jakob kann der Last seiner Täuschung nicht mehr ausweichen. Die Boten kehren zurück und sagen ihm, dass Esau kommt, um Jakob zu treffen, und er bringt vierhundert Männer mit ihm. Natürlich geht Jakob davon aus, dass sie Gewalt im Sinn haben. So antwortet er taktisch, um die Zerstörung zu minimieren – er teilt seine Familien und Waren in zwei Gruppen auf, so dass, wenn eine Gruppe vernichtet wird, die andere eine Chance hat zu überleben und sein Geschlecht fortzusetzen.

Und hier, in 32: 9-12, kämpft er mit dem theologischen Problem, wie Gottes Verheißung erfüllt werden kann, wenn er und seine Familie ausgelöscht werden sollten. Aber wir bemerken, dass der Segen, den er zitiert, derjenige ist, der ihm im Traum zukam, und nicht der, den er von Esau gestohlen hat. Dieser Segen geht darum, dass er die Welt segnen wird … und nicht selbst reich und mächtig werden sollte. Die Geschichte bekommt jetzt einen Sinn. Und Jakob, der immer noch davon ausgeht, dass andere Leute – insbesondere Esau – genauso verrückt sind wie er selbst, versucht, Esau zu beschwichtigen, indem er ihm Geschenke von seinem Reichtum gibt.

Und dann, nachdem er sein Volk vor sich her geschickt hatte, (vielleicht wollte er ein bisschen Zeit ohne Familie?) hat er eine zweite seltsame Begegnung. Der Traum war bedeutsam, aber hier kämpft er mit einem Unbekannten, der ihn verwundet, aber schließlich gesegnet zurück lässt. Jakob sagt ihm: “Ich will dich nicht gehen lassen, wenn du mich nicht segnest.” (32:26) Dann sagt der anonyme Kämpfer: “Du sollst nicht mehr Jakob heißen, sondern Israel, denn du hast mit Gott und mit Menschen gekämpft, und hast gewonnen. “(32:28)

“Gewonnen”? Aber wie? Was bedeutet das? Und warum durfte Jakob dann den Fluss überqueren, um seinen Bruder zu treffen? Vielleicht deswegen, weil Jakob, der seit so vielen Jahrzehnten mit Gott und sich selbst kämpfte, weil er den Segen von seinem Bruder gestohlen hat, nun bereit ist, den Segen und die Berufung zu übernehmen, die für immer für ihn bestimmt war. Er hat eine Lüge gelebt – ein zweitbestes Leben gelebt, als er versuchte, der Mensch zu sein, der er gar nicht sein sollte. Nicht nur hat er seinem Bruder dessen Berufung beraubt, sondern er hat sich auch selbst verleugnet. Und an dem Punkt, an dem er das realisiert und sich damit auseinandersetzt, weiß er (in den Worten von 32:30), dass er das Gesicht Gottes gesehen hat, und hat trotzdem überlebt.

Also, nach all dieser Zeit kommen wir schließlich zu unserem Stückchen der Geschichte – eine Geschichte, die keinen Sinn machen würde ohne das Detail und die Erzählung, die ich gerade skizziert habe.

33: 1-3: Jakob verbeugt sich siebenmal auf den Boden vor Esau – ein Akt der Unterwerfung vor der Macht des anderen. Mit anderen Worten, Jakob gibt Esau den Segen, der immer Esau gehörte: Er verbeugt sich und erkennt in Esau die Person, deren Segen es war, Reichtum zu haben und Macht auszuüben. Jakobs Segen und Berufung war anders und wurde nun schließlich von ihm angenommen. Und es ist Esau, der vor Freude und Verwirrung überrascht ist. Anders als der ältere Bruder des verlorenen Sohnes, freut er sich, dass die Entfremdung vorbei ist, dass der Bruder zurückgekehrt ist. Esau lehnt die Geschenke ab, aber für Jakob ist es wichtig, sie ihm zu geben … und Esau akzeptiert schließlich. Herden bedeuten Reichtum. Dann trennen sie sich wieder.

Und die Geschichte geht weiter.

Nun, was sollen wir daraus machen? Und warum habe ich euch gesagt, was ihr für euch selbst lesen könntet?

In dem ausgezeichneten Buch, auf das ich am Anfang verwiesen habe, betrachtet Jonathan Sacks diese Texte im Zusammenhang mit dem Versuch, besser zu verstehen, wie wir das Problem der religiösen Gewalt in der heutigen Welt ansprechen könnten. Simplistische Annahmen, dass Israel-Palästina und Judentum-Islam die Grundlage ihrer Feindschaft in ihren heiligen Texten finden, müssen durch eine bessere Lesung dieser Texte herausgefordert werden. Er lädt uns ein, sie durch eine andere Linse zu lesen. Und diese Linse hat mit der Bedeutung des Wortes ‘Segen’ zu tun. Mit Bezug auf die Geschwister-Rivalität, wie sie von Freud und Girard (“mimetisches Verlangen”) verstanden wird, sieht er eine zentrale Rolle im menschlichen Konflikt als “der Wunsch, das zu haben, was dein Bruder hat oder gar, was dein Bruder ist”. (S. 90)

Und, so schlägt er eine Lesart vor, nach der der Islam, das Christentum und das Judentum lange in einer gewalttätigen, manchmal tödlichen Umarmung eingeschlossen waren. “Ihre Beziehung ist Geschwister-Rivalität, voller mimetischer Wünsche (laut Girard): das Verlangen nach dem gleichen [Segen], Abrahams Versprechen”. (S.98)

Ismael wird von Gott gesegnet werden (15: 5, 16: 9-10, 21: 12-13, 21: 17-20). Israel ist ursprünglich für ein bestimmtes Schicksal bestimmt, aber “Gott hat gehört” Ismaels Stimme. (Wir merken, dass beide Söhne an Abrahams Grab stehen -in 25: 8-9.)

Die Geschichte von Jakob und Esau unterstreicht unser Verständnis von Gott und den Schriften. “Sobald wir das Geheimnis Jakobs dekodiert haben, wird unser Verständnis von Bund und Identität für immer verändert werden.” (S.125)

Jakob musste selbst den Segen empfangen, den Gott für ihn bestimmt hatte. “Er musste er selbst sein, kein Mensch der Natur, sondern einer, dessen Ohren auf eine Stimme jenseits der Natur abgestimmt waren, der Ruf Gottes, für etwas anderes als Reichtum oder Macht zu leben, nämlich für den menschlichen Geist als den Atem Gottes, und die Menschenwürde als das Bild Gottes”. (S.137)

Das heißt: Jakob erkennt, dass der Segen, den er von Esau genommen hat, tatsächlich nie für ihn bestimmt war, und er gibt ihn zurück. In der Vergangenheit wollte Jakob Esau sein. In der Zukunft wird er nicht darum kämpfen, Esau zu sein, sondern er selbst. In der Vergangenheit hielt er Esaus Ferse. In der Zukunft wird er sich an Gott festhalten. Er wird ihn nicht loslassen; und Gott wird Jakob nicht loslassen. “Lass Esau los, damit du frei sein kannst, Gott zu halten.” Jonathan Sacks schreibt: “Frieden kommt, wenn wir unsere Reflexion im Angesicht Gottes sehen, und den Wunsch, jemand anderes zu sein, loslassen.” (S.139)

Also müssen wir nicht vortäuschen, jemand anders zu sein, um den Segen Gottes zu bekommen. Wir werden von Gott geliebt für das, was wir sind, nicht für das, was jemand anderes ist. Wir haben alle unseren eigenen Segen.

Am Anfang dieser Bibelarbeit stellte ich drei Fragen. Jetzt kehren wir zu diesen Fragen zurück.

Erstens, wie wichtig sind Gesichter?

Gesichter sind sehr wichtig. Bei Peniel (32: 22-32) behauptet Jakob, Gott von “Angesicht zu Angesicht” gesehen zu haben. Als er später seinen Bruder trifft, sagt er: “Ich sah dein Angesicht, als sähe ich Gottes Angesicht, und du hast mich freundlich angesehen ” (33,10). Der deutsche Theologe Gerd Theissen bemerkt, dass dreimal in dieser Geschichte das Zeichen der Versöhnung ist, die Freiheit, “von Angesicht zu Angesicht” zu sehen. Und bevor Jakob seinen entfremdeten Bruder wieder trifft, sagt er (nach dem hebräischen): “Vielleicht kann ich sein Gesicht mit dem Geschenk abdecken, das vor meinem Gesicht geht; Und danach werde ich sein Gesicht sehen; Vielleicht wird er mein Gesicht aufheben.” In dem Gesicht seines Bruders sieht er das Gesicht von Gott – ein Gesicht, das er schon vorher in einem Traum und am Ufer des Jabbok gesehen hatte. In dieser Versöhnung findet Jakob den Frieden, weil er nun – schließlich – erkannte, dass Gott ihn kennt und liebt und segnet … als Jakob und nicht als Esau.

Die zweite Frage: wann sollten wir mit Gott und mit selbst kämpfen?

Wir sind in unseren Entfremdungen dazu berufen, mit Gott zu kämpfen – wie auch die Psalmisten immer die Wahrheit aussprachen, und nie versuchten, die Wahrheit vor Gott zu verbergen. Gleichgültigkeit ist die größte Sünde. Kämpfen heißt, Gott und sich selbst ernst zu nehmen. Diese Erfahrung – der Kampf mit Gott und mit mir – ist nie leicht, und ich werde immer irgendwie verwundet werden. Aber dort liegt auch der Segen.

Wir werden immer unruhig sein in einem Haus, das nicht unser ist, wenn wir die Berufung nicht akzeptieren können, die Gott für uns beabsichtigt hat. Wenn wir nach dem streben, was anderen gehört, ist es, als ob wir uns und unsere Kinder zu Feindschaften und Konflikten und Eifersucht verurteilen, aus denen wir und sie zu oft nicht entkommen können.

Und die dritte Frage: wie kann ich entdecken, was für einen Segen Gott mir geben will?

Ich kann damit anfangen, anzuerkennen, dass Gott mich liebt, und dass Gott auch meinen Bruder liebt. Wir beide können gesegnet werden. Es soll keinen Kampf geben.

Aber diese Geschichte von Jakob und Esau ist kein romantischer Hollywood-Film. Die Brüder trennen sich noch einmal. Die Versöhnung war kräftig, aber sie ist nie vollständig. Das Leben geht immer weiter.

Next Page »