The headline doesn't sound too promising, does it? But, it brings together the last couple of days before I return to Bradford tomorrow for a week of work before having a scheduled holiday the following week.

Having finished Ben Quash's excellent Found Theology, I intended to just spend the last couple of days reading German frivolous stuff. But, I started on Imaginative Apologetics, edited by Andrew Davison instead and got hooked. Serendipitously, it hangs together very well with the Quash book, although written from a different perspective and toward a different end.

Imaginative Apologetics recognises that the current irrational obsession of the New Atheists with what they think of as 'pure reason' (as if it wasn't mediated by a person who brings to the task a tradition and unargued-for presuppositions about the world, the way it is, and why it is the way it is) and 'pure science' (see above) does not need to be responded to on its own redundant terms, but that the premises of the argument can be questioned. And, to cut a long argument short, people need to be appealed to at the level of imagination and emotion – finding a consistency with real lived experience … which is more (but never less than) than 'rational' – and the Christian tradition has a huge amount to offer in this respect.

In fact, Davison himself makes the case right at the outset for Christian confidence when he writes:

The Christian faith does not simply, or even mainly, propose a few additional facts about the world. Rather, belief in the Christian God invites a new way to understand everything. (p.xxv)

He also cursorily quotes Yale's Denys Turner's observation that “the best way to be an atheist is to avoid asking certain questions”. The purpose of this is not to dismiss atheism or atheists, but to ask robust questions about the assumptions and presuppositions that lie before and behind assertions about reality and the absence of God. There is material here for good debate, if the theistic case is accorded some credibility and not simply dismissed prior to consideration. As Alison Milbank puts it, the apologetic task of the Christian is not to appeal to pure reason (as if there could be such a thing), but “to awaken in the reader this feeling of homesickness for the truth”. (p.33)

Each essay is worth reading in itself and I don't intend to go through the whole book here. However, the appeal to art, literature and the imaginative life of a human person (as well as communities) chimes in very well with the case being argued theologically by Ben Quash in his book. In other words, take culture seriously; explore and appeal to the imagination that takes reason seriously; be confident about the role of the imagination in comprehending reality.

Having read this stuff in a cafe in Basel yesterday, I then moved on to the Kunstmuseum Basel. I particularly wanted to see the Hans Holbein painting of the dead Christ (referred to by Ben Quash in his book) and the impressive Impressionist collection. There is nothing quite like an art gallery to make me feel ignorant and illiterate. I look at paintings and know that I don't know how to read them – I don't know the language. I had intended to scan the bulk of the collections and stay for longer with the stuff I knew a little about from my reading, but I found I had paid to see the special exhibition of James Ensor: The Surprised Masks.

I had never heard of James Ensor. I realised I had come across several of his works (The Fall of the Rebel Angels and The Entry of Christ into Brussels on Mardi Gras, for example) but I knew nothing about him or his art. It was stunning. The paintings were interesting, but it was the ink drawings that grabbed me. They explore death, dying, mortality and humanity – but with the sort of humour that had me laughing as I looked at them. It reminded me a little of how I felt when I read Robert Crumb's cartoon version of The Book of Genesis.

The point here is that art goes beyond pure reason (but entirely reasonably) into the imagination in a way that digs at 'truth' and pushes our perceptions of what we assume to be 'reality'.

And this, bizarrely, is what takes me on to immigration. If coming to Switzerland helped me escape some of the sterile immigration debates in England, I quickly got plunged back into them. Recently a referendum narrowly backed the view that restrictions should be imposed on immigration into Switzerland. This caused a huge storm both here and in the wider European Union: decisions have consequences. The political fall-out has been interesting to read whilst actually here in Switzerland. And 'imagination' – in the perverse, but common sense of 'fantasy' – has come powerfully into play in the rhetoric around the issue.

The friend I am staying with is employed by the Swiss Reformed Church to engage in industrial and economic matters (Pfarramt für Industrie und Wirtschaft). He was invited by the local newspaper, the bz Basel, to attend last week's opening night of a performance of Max Frisch's Biedermann und die Brandstifter and to be interviewed by the newspaper afterwards. You really have to know the play, but the performance had a twist in that the stories – in their own words – of immigrants to Switzerland were told to a surprised audience. The interview appeared today and Martin (Dürr) has been getting very supportive messages all day. In the interview – which is amusing as well as intelligent – he sharply calls into question the rhetoric propagated by the right wing that mass immigration is threatening the Swiss way of life. The right wing press (in some cases owned by the leader of the right wing party, the SVP) fan the flames of fear whilst simultaneously offering themselves as the saviours of the nation. Martin put it like this (my translation):

We have to draw a line. For many years the SVP has succeeded in building fears and resentments. The play exposes the mechanisms behind this. I believe there are some very respectable people in the SVP. But, the element that has the say has managed for years to present itself as both victim and saviour. This is a fascinating achievement… They present themselves as victims of the foreign masters in Brussels and of the Left and the Greens and even the remaining left wing press. These are doing terrible things to us and our Swiss identity is being destroyed – say the SVP. At the same time they get up and announce: “Comrades, don't be afraid! We offer you the antidote to this. We are the only ones to really fight to keep the Switzerland that has existed since 1291.”

Sound familiar? Create the spectre – regardless of facts and reality – and then offer a solution to the fear that you have created. It is an interesting and powerful example of political apologetics. It works on the imagination by conjuring a fantasy and then calling it reality.

We are not alone…

 

This is the text of my paper to the Konrad Adenauer Stiftung symposium in Cadenabbia, Italy, on Religion in the Public Space on 29 October 2013.

Der Weg der Kirche von England gegenüber Unwissen und Distanz zu religiösem Glaube

Ich möchte mit einer Frage anfangen: Für wen ist die Kirche von England eigentlich da? Denn, wie Bob Dylan es formuliert: “The times they are a-changin'”. Und die Kirche existiert nicht primär für diejenigen, die jeden Sonntag an einem Gottesdienst teilnehmen, sondern für alle, die in England leben, ob sie gläubig sind oder nicht.

In England unterliegen wir nicht dem Irrtum, das Christentum sei tot. Es sind diejenigen Formen des Christentums und der Kirche, die im Britischen Empire entstanden und im 19. Jahrhundert exportiert wurden, die im 20. Jahrhundert anfingen dahinzusiechen, als Europa von Kriegen und Gewalt erschüttert wurde und Fragen laut wurden über Gott, die Geschichte und die Rolle (Bedeutung? )der Menschheit. Die bisherigen Überzeugungen über den Platz und die Rolle der Kirche in der Gesellschaft wurden in diesem Jahrhundert erschüttert, und zu Beginn des 21. Jahrhunderts sind Religion allgemein und das Christentum im besonderen leichte Beute für herablassende Ablehnung sowohl in der akademischen wie der populären Kultur.

Heutzutage müssen wir einfallsreich, selbstbewusst und fantasievoll sein, wenn wir den Ort und die Bedeutung des christlichen Glaubens für das persönliche und das öffentliche Leben beschreiben und dafür streiten wollen. Wir müssen Wege finden, das Evangelium von Jesus Christus so zu beschreiben – und als Zeugen dieses Evangeliums zu leben – die Menschen zur Kirche ziehen. Und wir müssen junge Christen ausbilden, die bislang keine Ahnung haben von der Bibel oder irgendeiner christlichen Geschichte. Mit anderen Worten: Die Kirche muss sich ihren Platz in der Gesellschaft verdienen und sie muss im öffentlichen Raum selbstbewusst agieren; die Kirche kann nicht davon ausgehen, einfach einen Platz in der Nation oder eine Stimme im öffentlichen Raum zu besitzen.

Diese Einsicht ist besonders wichtig in einer Zeit, in der der Säkularismus stärker wird – insbesondere in der Gestalt der aggressiven neuen Atheisten. Terry Eagleton (prominente britische Professor of Cultural Theory and English Literature) wirft den neuen Atheisten vor, einen billigen Atheismus zu betreiben – ohne die intellektuelle Anstrengung des Nachdenkens und Debattierens selbst zu leisten, sondern stattdessen auf dem Rücken anderer Leute wie (Professor) Richard Dawkins zu reiten, der, statt über einen Fall zu diskutieren, einfach eingängige Feststellungen trifft.

In England hat der Aufstieg des Säkularismus, begleitet von der modischen und oft vereinfachenden Missionierung durch die neuen Atheisten, eine Atmosphäre sowohl von Skepsis (die meiner Meinung nach ganz gesund ist) und Zynismus (der ungesund ist) geschaffen. Man könnte einiges sagen über die Art und Weise, wie diese Debatten in den Medien geführt werden, aber für meine Zwecke hier genügt es zu sagen, dass es zumindest einen sehr hilfreichen Effekt auf die Kirche hat: Christen müssen stärker nachdenken, sie müssen ihren Glauben kennen und ihn leben, sie müssen sich bewusst für ein Leben in der Kirche entscheiden (und nicht einfach hineingeboren werden) und müssen selbstbewusster sein als Christen in der großen weiten Welt. Religiöser Glauben darf sich genauso wenig in die geschützte Privatsphäre zurückziehen, wie die Säkularisten allein Anspruch auf den öffentlichen Raum erheben dürfen.

Dies ist der kulturelle Hintergrund, vor dem alles andere in England stattfindet. Eine Wissenschaftlerin, mit der ich neulich sprach, beklagte sich bitterlich über die Unwissenheit von Schülern und Studenten im Blick auf Religion allgemein und das Christentum im Besonderen. Wie soll man englische Geschichte, Kunst, Literatur, Poesie oder Musik verstehen, ohne ein paar grundlegende Geschichten der Bibel und ihre Sprache zu kennen? Es ist ein bisschen so, als wollte man die deutsche Politik und Geschichte verstehen, während man die Reformation oder die Rolle des Christentums in Europa ignoriert.

In England bezeichnen wir das als ‚religiöses Analphabetentum‘ und es ist vor allem in Bezug auf die Medien von Bedeutung. Die BBC hat inzwischen eine interne Fortbildung, mit der sie den Versuch macht, Journalisten und Moderatoren im Blick auf die Rolle der Religion in der Welt weiterzubilden. Es ist einfach unmöglich, den Irak, Afghanistan, Syrien, den 11. September, die Vereinigten Staaten von Amerika – um nur ein paar zu nennen – ohne differentierte Kenntnis der Religion zu verstehen.

Vor zwei Wochen (am 17en Oktober) haben eine Medienfirma und der Theos Think Tank in London eine Initiative gestartet. Sie wollen regelmäßig kostenfreie Podcasts produzieren, die sich mit der sich wandelnden religiösen Landschaft Englands auseinandersetzen. In der entsprechenden Pressemitteilung heißt es:

“Der Kirchenbesuch ist in Großbritannien dramatisch zurückgegangen, nur noch 7 Prozent (der Bevölkerung) besuchen jede Woche einen Gottesdienst. Dennoch bezeichnet sich jeder Dritte derjenigen, die nie eine Kirche besuchen, als Christ, und mehr als jeder Dritte glaubt an eine höhere Macht. Weniger Menschen fühlen sich von organisierter Religion angezogen, aber mehr Menschen glauben an Engel – jeder Dritte tut das. Gleichzeitig erleben manche Glaubensgemeinschaften eine Blütezeit wie nie zuvor – von den schwarzen Pfingstkirchen bis zum Buddhismus. Dieses neue spirituelle Klima will „Things Unseen“ – Unsichtbare Dinge thematisieren, indem es zum Nachdenken anregende, intelligente Radiobeiträge als freie Downloads anbietet.

Unsichtbare Dinge will Themen anpacken, die im Blick auf das neue spirituelle Klima wirklich erstaunlich sind:

  • Grenzphänomene religiöser Erfahrung, wie etwa „Phantombesuche“ von Sterbenden. Ein Wissenschaftler sagt, dies ist nicht einfach nur der Stoff, aus dem schlechtes Nachtprogramm im Fernsehen gestrickt wird – aber wie passen solche Phänomene in die Weltsicht des Christentums und anderer Religionen?
  • Neue Dilemmata, wie zum Beispiel das ethische Minenfeld, das sich durch die Sozialen Medien in einer multi-religiösen Welt ergibt
  • Die spirituelle Dimension der sogenannten human interest stories – der Geschichten, die das Leben so schreibt. Diese spirituelle Dimension wird selten betrachtet – zum Beispiel die langfristigen spirituellen Folgen für diejenigen Familien, in denen ein Angehöriger vermisst und niemals gefunden wird.”

Dies fasst die Situation in England ganz gut zusammen und – wie ich vermute – auch die Situation in anderen europäischen Ländern, wenngleich sie dort vielleicht noch nicht so klar erkennbar ist. Die Art und Weise, wie religiöser Glaube zum Ausdruck gebracht wird, verändert sich rapide und organisierte Religion sieht sich vor ernsthafte Herausforderungen gestellt.

Der Aufstieg von Säkularismen – und ich spreche hier ganz bewusst im Plural – baut Druck aus zwei entgegengesetzten Richtungen auf: (a) durch den Versuch, alles zu marginalisieren, was mit christlichem Glauben oder seiner Ausdrucksweise zu tun hat – in der Annahme, dass jede religiöse Weltanschauung nur eine Privatangelegenheit ist, während das, was wir den ‚säkularen Humanismus‘ nennen können, das Vorrecht auf den öffentlichen Raum hat, und (b) durch Formen des Multikulturalismus, die die Religion auf eine Anzahl vergleichbarer Phänomene reduziert und relativiert – aber ohne deren Inhalte ernst zu nehmen.

Seit dem 11. September wird dies noch verstärkt durch die Annahme vieler Politiker und Medienleute, dass Religion die Ursache eines Problems anstatt die Quelle der Lösung ist – und dass religiöse Menschen daran gehindert werden müssen, sich gegenseitig zu bekämpfen, auch dort, wo es gar keine Anzeichen für einen Konflikt gibt.

Daraus resultiert, was wir oben als ‘religiöses Analphabetentum‘ bezeichnen. In der Kirche von England setzen wir uns auf verschiedenste Weise und auf unterschiedlichen Ebenen damit auseinander. (Wenn Menschen fragen: ‚Warum tut die Kirche nicht etwas, um…‘, dann frage ich meist, wer denn ihrer Meinung nach ‚die Kirche‘ ist. Ist es der Pastor? Oder die Ortsgemeinde? Oder die Diözese, die Landeskirche? Oder die landesweite Kirche? Oder die Generalsynode oder die Bischöfe? Denn die Kirche von England arbeitet auf all diesen Ebenen.)

Auf nationaler Ebene beschäftigt sich die Kirche von England zum Beispiel durch das House of Bishops, durch die (26) Bischöfe, die im House of Lords sitzen, durch den Ausschuss für Mission und öffentliche Angelegenheiten (Mission & Public Affairs Panel) in der Generalsynode und durch die Bildungsabteilung mit diesen Fragen, indem sie Richtlinien erarbeitet, Ressourcen zur Verfügung stellt und sich mit der Regierung, mit Politikern, Organisationen und anderen Gremien auseinandersetzt. Die Diözesen bieten Schulungen für die Geistlichen und die Laien an. Auf der Ebene der Ortsgemeinde (the parish) gibt es oft sehr kreatives Engagement in den Schulen und anderen lokalen Vereinen und Gemeinschaften. Bischöfe erheben die Stimme und engagieren sich in der öffentlichen Debatte, in akademischen Kreisen oder in den Medien – dazu werde ich gleich noch mehr sagen.

Ein konkretes Beispiel für diese Art der Auseinandersetzung mit den Gegebenheiten der modernen Gesellschaft ist die große Anzahl an Glaubenskursen, die auf lokaler Ebene von den christlichen Kirchen angeboten werden. Vom ‚Alpha‘- oder dem ‚Emmaus-Kurs‘ bis hin zu neuen Materialien unter dem Titel ‚Pilgrim/Pilger‘, die das House of Bishops herausgegeben hat, zielen all diese Initiativen darauf, Menschen dort zu begegnen, wo sie in ihrem Leben gerade sind und mit all den Fragen, die sie gerade haben. Die Tage des gelehrten Monologs sind weitgehend vorüber – jetzt leben wir in einer Welt des Gesprächs, in der die Kirche ihre Anwesenheit rechtfertigen, und für das Recht gehört zu werden, streiten muss.

Die Kirche von England lernt, den Menschen dort zu begegnen, wo sie tatsächlich sind (und nicht, wo wir wünschten, dass sie sein sollten) und sie lernt – und das ist vielleicht noch wichtiger – in Sprachen zu sprechen, die gehört und verstanden werden können. In den letzten zehn Jahren haben wir tausende Projekte entwickelt, die wir „fresh expressions of church“ nennen: neue, frische Gesichter oder Ausdrucksweisen der Kirche. Dazu zählen innovative Gemeindeformen in Clubs, Kneipen, in Privathäusern oder sogar in Firmen. Nach und nach ermutigt das die Anglikaner, immer neu darüber nachzudenken, wie man Menschen in ihren jeweiligen Lebenszusammenhängen erreichen kann.

Diese neue Experimentierfreude in Sachen christlicher Verkündigung ist vielleicht am deutlichsten sichtbar in der Art und Weise, wie wir mit den Medien umgehen – insbesondere mit den Sozialen Medien. Ich will anhand einiger persönlicher Beispiele zeigen, was das mit unserer Relevanz zu tun hat.

Ich bin einer der so genannten Medien-Bischöfe der Kirche von England. Das bedeutet nicht nur, dass ich mit Medienpolitik auf nationaler Ebene zu tun habe, ich bin auch Vorsitzender einer Mediengesellschaft und ich gehe selbst regelmäßig auf Sendung. Mein Interesse dabei liegt weniger bei den christlichen Medienunternehmen, die den ohnehin schon Überzeugten predigen, sondern eher bei der BBC und anderen unabhängigen Medienproduzenten. Jede Programmsparte verlangt dabei einen anderen kulturellen Bezugsrahmen und eine andere Art von Sprache. Wenn ich zum Beispiel ein Manuskript für eine Ansprache auf BBC Radio 4 schreibe, gehe ich von einer gebildeten Zuhörerschaft aus, die über Email oder Twitter auf das Gehörte reagieren. Wenn ich eine Morgenandacht für die Chris Evans Frühstücksshow auf BBC Radio 2 schreibe – was ich regelmäßig tue – muss ich eine andere Form wählen – immerhin hören dort wöchentlich 10 Millionen Menschen zu, die sich nicht ausgesucht haben, mir inmitten des schnellen und trendigen Programmes zuzuhören. Und wenn Elton John neben einem sitzt, sieht man das eigene Zwei-Minuten-Manuskript noch mal mit ganz anderen Augen.

Diese Art des Engagiert-Seins verlangt Einfallsreichtum und einen gewissen Abenteuergeist. Man muss die Aufmerksamkeit des Publikums packen, muss ihre Vorstellungskraft reizen mit einer Geschichte oder einem Bild, muss etwas Sinnvolles sagen, das in der Erinnerung hängen bleibt und muss einen Mehrwert für das Programm insgesamt liefern. Mit anderen Worten: Der Inhalt muss zum Medium passen, denn das Medium legt alles andere fest. Ist das nicht der Ort, wo die Kirche sein sollte?

Nun, dies führt uns zu einer weiteren Frage in Bezug auf das religiöse Analphabetentum (oder das religiöse Unwissen). Gemeinsam mit anderen setze ich mich dafür ein, dass die BBC die Religion insgesamt einen anderen Stellenwert einräumt, indem sie einen Chefredakteur für Religion einsetzt. Es gibt einen Chefredakteur für Wirtschaft, für Politik, für Sport und so weiter. Ihre Aufgabe ist es nicht, für ihr Themenfeld zu missionieren, sondern die Ereignisse in diesem Bereich zu interpretieren – oder die Ereignisse in der Welt zu interpretieren, wie sie sich durch die Brille ihres Bereiches darstellen. Wie war zum Beispiel nach dem 11. September die wirtschaftliche Sichtweise, wie sich die Welt nun darstellt oder interpretiert werden sollte? Genauso sollten wir davon ausgehen, dass die Menschen die Welt um sie herum nicht vollständig verstehen können ohne ein gewisses Verständnis dessen, wie Religion funktioniert und welche Auswirkungen sie auf das Weltgeschehen hat.

Diese Art der Auseinandersetzung können nur einige von uns führen. Die Stimme des Gemeindepfarrers vor Ort hätte hier kein Gewicht; anders als die der Bischöfe, die durch ihre Erfahrung und ihre Beschäftigung mit den Medien eine gewisse Autorität in diesen Fragen erlangt haben. Gleichzeitig bietet die Kirche auf nationaler und regionaler Ebene viele Kurse an, um Christinnen und Christen zu ermutigen und zu befähigen, in den Medien aktiv zu sein, besonders in den Sozialen Medien wie Twitter, Facebook und so weiter.

Das Entscheidende ist, das religiöse Analphabetentum in vielfältiger Weise anzugehen, dem jeweiligen Anlass und der Art des Diskurses angemessen – und die Kirche von England tut das.

Der Schlüssel dafür ist Einfallsreichtum und Vorstellungskraft. Die Kirche von England gibt sich nicht der Nostalgie hin, indem wir uns wünschen, die Welt wäre anders – oder davon träumen, wie schön sie einmal war. Stattdessen suchen und ermutigen wir kreative Wege der Begegnung mit den Menschen, dort, wo sie sich in ihrem täglichen Leben befinden. Ja, das bedeutet auch viele Debatten mit den so genannten Neo-Atheisten und anderen. Ja, das bedeutet auch, auf Diskussionen zu antworten wie selbst welche zu beginnen. Es bedeutet aber auch, die in Politik und Medien weitverbreitete Annahme zu hinterfragen, dass Religion Privatsache sei und auf das Privatleben beschränkt bleiben sollte, damit der öffentliche Raum frei bleibt für diejenigen, die ihre eigene Weltsicht (oder kulturelle Prägung) für neutral halten.

In England sehen wir uns einer sich rasant verändernden kulturellen Landschaft gegenüber, besonders im Blick auf den Multikulturalismus. In Bradford, wo ich lebe, sind 80 Prozent der Einwohner asiatisch-stämmige Muslime. Was heißt es, in einer solchen Gemeinde anglikanische Kirche zu sein? Diese Frage haben wir im September bei einer Konferenz behandelt, als die Meissen Kommission nach Bradford kam und wir untersucht haben, wie ‚Kirche‘ in einem solchen Kontext aussehen kann. Kern unseres anglikanischen Ansatzes ist ein Ausdruck, den wir für unsere Beziehungen mit Menschen anderer Religionen verwenden: Presence and Engagement Da-Sein und Engagement (Anwesenheit und Einsatz?)

Wir sind geographisch und territorial, wir sind physisch anwesend in unsere Gemeinde und bieten den Menschen um uns herum Raum und Beziehung. Der Ausdruck ‚Presence and Engagement‘ bringt den anglikanischen Ansatz auf den Punkt, wie wir unsere Aufgabe in England auf allen Ebenen sehen: Wir sind da und wir sind bereit, uns die Hände schmutzig zu machen.

Mir scheint, dass dies am besten – und am präzisesten – illustriert, wo sich die Kirche von England sieht (d.h. wie die Kirche von England ihre Rolle und ihre Aufgabe sieht) in einer Gesellschaft, in der Religion oft missverstanden, falsch dargestellt oder ignoriert wird. Es gibt schlimmere Orte…

Isn't it a crying shame that the Guide Movement didn't read Lord Sacks' Spectator piece on the (not-so) new atheistm before evacuating the Girl Guide Promise of meaning and filling it with vacuous nonsense?

Mention of God has gone, replaced by “be true to myself and develop my beliefs”. Which, no doubt, will please anyone who thinks there is such a thing as a 'neutral', content-free or assumptionless language or worldview. It beggars belief.

Does it really mean that any belief will do – á la Joseph's 'any dream will do' nonsense? Really any belief? Or only those deemed acceptable… by whom… and on what basis?

Content-free language does not create neutral self-consciousness; it merely empties all language of meaning. And that does not create safe little altruistic models of moderation; it opens the door to little Hitlers as well as Snow Whites.

Even those who are glad to see God go must be embarrassed by what has replaced him.

 

Three stories penetrate the work-ridden last few days.

Yesterday Trevor Kavanagh, associate editor and former political editor of the Sun had the nerve to accuse the Metropolitan Police of wasting time and resources on their investigation of criminality at the heart of News International. He described police tactics as treating suspected journalists like “members of an organised crime gang”. He objected to dawn raids and intrusive searches of journalists’ homes.

Forgive my naïveté, but why does he think the police are doing this at all? Would he or his newspaper have had any patience with police ignoring criminality on an industrial scale in some other area of society? Did he consider the handling of the MPs’ expenses scandal as a waste of time and money – a gross overreaction? Does he really think that investigations into corruption and criminality at the Sun is ‘disproportionate’?

I usually find Trevor Kavanagh interesting, but this has left me staggered. Is he so out of touch that he still doesn’t get the public outrage at this enormous corruption? The irony of his choice of words is that the need for expensive and thorough police investigation arises directly from crime that looks distinctly ‘organised’. Or is it just that it is OK for ordinary mortals to have their lives intruded upon, shredded and dumped – their reputations rubbished and their families disturbed – but somehow wrong for journalists to suffer the same treatment? I am boggled.

Richard Dawkins is at it again – although Giles Fraser rattled him on the BBC Radio 4 Today programme this morning. As Dawkins mocked respondents to his poll who couldn’t name the first gospel, Fraser embarrassed him by exposing his inability to remember the full title of Darwin’s Origin of Species. His latest evangelistic campaign is just silly. In danger of confusing atheism with secularism (they are not the same), he perpetuates the pretence that he occupies neutral space whereas religious people are somewhere up the loaded loony scale. What makes him think that his world view is to be privileged above all others is still unclear. Anyway, his survey proves little – and certainly not what he thinks it proves.

Baroness Warsi has complained to the Pope about rampant and aggressive secularism that is marginalising religion in general and Christianity in particular in Britain today. Not having had time today to read all the reports of this, I remain unclear why she needs to tell the Pope what he already thinks. But, the question is really whether or not she is right. I just hope she doesn’t slip into the language of ‘persecution’.

The most interesting two responses I have seen to Dawkins and Warsi are by Giles Fraser and Julian Baggini. Rational atheist argument is fine and secularist campaigning acceptable. But, where does the mindless aggression come from? Why the irrational evangelism that doesn’t even pretend to be tolerant of any world view that differs from it’s own fundamentalism?

The world appears a bit weird when Man Utd lose 6-1 at home to Man City. Wonderful (says the Scouser who is worried that two Manchester clubs now rule the Premiership).

But, more interesting is the response by atheist academic philosopher Daniel Came to the refusal by New Atheist academic biologist Richard Dawkins to debate with William Lane Craig. Dawkins gave his reasons in the Guardian here – and then got a response from Came. (Paul Vallely has also contributed in yesterday’s Independent.)

Not surprisingly, I am with Came on this. The New Atheists give atheism a bad name by substituting assertion for argument. Watch this space – the debate between Dawkins and Came might be even more interesting than debates between the theists and the New Atheists.

I know they sound like a firm of solicitors, but it’s not law that they have in common.

Terry Eagleton wrote an excoriatingly incisive critique of AC Grayling’s decision to leave Birkbeck College in order to set up the New College of the Humanities. Eagleton questions the motives, values and consequences of the establishment of this college – which only rich kids will be able to access. Others suspect it might be a successful venture, but don’t address some of Eagleton’s questions (especially of the values underlying the move).

Giles Fraser has a go at atheistic humanism, stripping bare the pretensions of an assumed humanism that has amnesia with respect to its own roots and fails to follow through the logic of its own case. He cites Nietzsche and Foucault en route to his challenge:

Indeed, the new atheists simply duck the challenge made by atheistic anti-humanism, believing their expensive scientific toys can outflank the alleged conceptual weakness of their humanism. Thus they dismiss the significance of philosophy just as much as they have always done of theology – as if the two were fundamentally in cahoots. But this is nonsense. Nietzsche, Marx and Freud attacked Christianity with passionate ferocity.

Christian theology of the 20th century has spent much of its time wrestling with the consequences. Why won’t the new atheists do the same?

It’s a good question. I wonder of any answers will be forthcoming. Probably not from the New College of the Humanities which appears to be headed towards the sort of thing Grayling & co hate about (their often misguided perceptions of) faith schools: only addressing matters from a narrow perspective that conforms to a set of philosophical assumptions that have been previously agreed – and won’t admit inconvenient theologies or anti-humanist philosophies.

Or will we be surprised?

I went into London today to have lunch with a friend who is ‘in media’. On the way in I read that ‘80% of Bill Bailey’s new show is a rant against Christianity’. Can’t remember exactly where I read it, but that was basically what it said. “Oh no,” I thought to myself, “here we go again. There’ll be more protests about Christians being persecuted and attacked.” And I was right! (Which is shameful when you see what is happening in the real world in Iraq…)

I am beginning to feel in a minority of one in being a Christian who doesn’t think we are being persecuted. ‘Misrepresented’, ‘misunderstood’ and ‘an easy target for people too lazy to think through their own assumptions’, maybe. Subject to educational and political assumptions that are sometimes staggering in their arrogance and ignorance in relation to Christianity in particular, definitely. But ‘persecuted’, no way.

I go with the agnostic Marxist Terry Eagleton when he complains that the so-called New Atheists have bought their atheism on the cheap and that this enables others to think that their easy dismissal of ‘religion’ (let alone Christianity) has inherent intellectual credibility – that Dawkins’ position is self-evidently true because it is Dawkins who says it. And it is obvious that the methodologies Dawkins adopts in his television tirades would never pass the editor’s desk were it to be driving towards a theistic theme. (It would be like me depicting Stalin in the first minute, extrapolating from Stalin that all atheists are on the same road as the Soviet dictator, then writing off atheism as having any intellectual, cultural or ethical credibility worth thinking about.)

As contributors to this blog have demonstrated, there is a thoughtful and intelligent discussion to be had between atheists and Christians (or theists) – one that presupposes mutual respect. I usually find Bill Bailey sharp and funny, so look forward to his new show. But, if it does turn out to be an easy potshot at Christianity, I guess I’ll just have to be big enough to take it. Popularity and big laughs don’t prove any point whatsoever.

The problem is that there is much about Christians that is funny or odd or open to question. Now is not an easy time to speak of ‘the ministry of reconciliation’ in a context in which Christians appear happy to accuse each other of all sorts of nastiness. But, if our reputation is tarnished and our credibility low, then we cannot blame anyone else for this… even if the reputation also involves selective reporting, misrepresentation and misunderstanding.

Anyway, to go back to the main point, being misunderstood or misrepresented by a liberal elite who dominate the public discourse with a confidence that is ignorant of its own (religious) illiteracy, is inconvenient, painful, embarrassing and should be countered. But, it isn’t persecution. Bill Bailey is not pulling our finger nails out or stopping our kids from going to university purely on account of their faith – he is simply doing what people have done to Christian faith since Calvary. It’s not clever and it is boringly predictable – get used to it. The way to counter it is to stop being ‘against’ anything we don’t like and proactively present what we are ‘for’ in the public space. And, for God’s sake, try to enjoy it.

I come back again and again to the need for Christians to put their own house in order, gain confidence in the content of the Christian faith (which, strictly speaking and in shorthand, means in ‘the Word made flesh’ – the person of God seen in Jesus Christ), question the assumptions of those who attack or question Christianity, and stop complaining about being victims of other people’s horribleness.

And the BBC still needs a ‘Religion Editor’